The Israeli Dervish: Miki Cohen a college teacher who ‘discovered’ the works of Jalal ad-Din Rumi — Aljazeera’s documentation including video, Photos and Text

The Israeli Dervish

We follow one man as he becomes the only Israeli granted access to the inner sanctum of the whirling Dervish order.

 

Attracted by Rumi’s writings and philosophy, Miki translates his works into Hebrew and practices whirling in worship.

What makes Cohen’s story so remarkable is that he is an Israeli.

The son of holocaust survivors and a veteran of the 1973 Arab-Israeli war, Cohen found himself searching for answers to his spiritual identity.

“I was in the Israeli army in the ’73 war. And the war mentality, the killing mentality, the feeling that we are on one side victims and on the other side we are the oppressors. So, what are we? So I started, you know, looking for bigger answers let’s say or deeper …. For many years I was looking in many places,” he explains.


Along with several other Israelis, he undertakes a spiritual search and is attracted by the mysticism of Sufism.
But Miki goes a step further. He travels to Konya in central Turkey, the resting place of Rumi and a city once known as the ‘citadel of Islam’ with a reputation for religious conservatism. It is the centre for the Mevlevi Sufi order of Islam.

Miki becomes one of few outsiders – and certainly the only Israeli – to be granted access to the inner sanctum of the whirling Dervishes.

Miki and Ayelet Adiv meet with their friends, Tsvika and Sara Lekach, who share their love of Sufism.

Read and view photos on Aljazeera com

->>>>><<<<<-

One Comment Add yours

  1. Alain Outhmani says:

    I have really enjoyed watching the Al jazeera report over your involvement into Soufism and Rumi’s spirituality…. I am into spirituality whatever it is…. Which poems would you recommend me to read to get a good understanding of Rumi teaching, please ? Thanks in advance for your reply. Kind regards. Alain

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.