Nasser Rabbat and the Museum of Lost Objects — Massachusetts Institute of Technology| Listen to BBC Radio Reports on destruction

MIT architect and historian helps the BBC trace the destruction of Syrian antiquities.

The Temple of Bel at Palmyra, a UNESCO World Heritage site, was reduced to rubble by the terrorist group ISIS in 2015. MIT professor Nasser Rabbat helps tell the story of this lost heritage as part of

The Temple of Bel at Palmyra, a UNESCO World Heritage site, was reduced to rubble by the terrorist group ISIS in 2015. MIT professor Nasser Rabbat helps tell the story of this lost heritage as part of “The Museum of Lost Objects,” a new BBC Radio series on sites and objects that have been destroyed or looted in Iraq and Syria.Photo: AignBernhard/Wikimedia Commons

Nasser Rabbat, the Aga Khan Professor for Islamic Architecture at MITNasser Rabbat, the Aga Khan Professor for Islamic Architecture at MIT and director of the Aga Khan Program for Islamic Architecture at MIT (AKPIA).-Photo courtesy of Nasser Rabbat.

The Great Mosque of Aleppo, built in 1090, possessed an unusual and significant minaret. Square and tiered, it towered over the city, with intricate Arabic inscriptions tracing different periods of its construction history.

But the minaret is now a lost part of the past — destroyed in 2013 during fighting between government forces and rebels in the ongoing conflict in Syria. A new BBC radio series, The Museum of Lost Objects, has set out to tell the stories of 10 antiquities or ancient sites, including the minaret, that have been destroyed or looted in Iraq and Syria.

“The destruction of cultural heritage in Syria and Iraq is malicious and ongoing,” says Nasser Rabbat, the Aga Khan Professor for Islamic Architecture at MIT and a commentator in the series. “The two countries and their history are the primary targets of this wanton carnage, but the whole world is losing irreplaceable examples of architecture and cultural artifacts.”

Other examples of destruction covered by the radio series include the Temple of Bel at Palmyra, a UNESCO World Heritage structure reduced to rubble by the terrorist group ISIS last August; the Winged Bull of Nineveh, a statue that flanked the gates of that ancient Assyrian city, defaced with a pneumatic drill in 2015; and the Armenian Church of Deir al-Zour, constructed in the 1980s and destroyed by bombs in 2014.

“The 10 episodes of this BBC Radio program try to go beyond reporting the losses to understand the complex histories of the monuments destroyed and to present them through the eyes of those who lived and worked with them, cared for them, and sometime lost their lives to defend them,” says Rabbat, who directs the Aga Khan Program for Islamic Architecture at MIT (AKPIA).

Rabbat contributes his perspective to three episodes:

  • Palmyra: The Temple of Bel (listen)
  • Minaret of the Umayyad Mosque, Aleppo (listen)
  • Al-Ma’arri the Poet (listen)

Read more on: MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) edu

->>>>><<<<<-

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s