Total Solar Eclipse 2017 Science Briefing From Nasa — Watch Videos

Published on 21 Jun 2017

During a June 21 media briefing from the Newseum in Washington, representatives from NASA, other federal agencies, and science organizations discussed the opportunity for scientific study offered by the total solar eclipse that will cross the U.S. on August 21.
Over the course of 100 minutes, 14 states across the United States will experience more than two minutes of darkness in the middle of the day. Additionally, a partial eclipse will be viewable across all of North America. The eclipse will provide a unique opportunity to study the sun, Earth, moon and their interaction because of the eclipse’s long path over land coast to coast. Scientists will be able to take ground-based and airborne observations over a period of an hour and a half to complement the wealth of data and images provided by space assets.

Source: Space Videos

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NASA : The 2017 Total Solar Eclipse

Published on 19 Aug 2017

On August 21, 2017, a continent-spanning wave of instruments from home-made pinhole cameras to the most sophisticated telescopes in operation today will be trained on the Eclipse Across America.

Source: Space Videos

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21 August:The Total Darkness:Everything to Know about The Great American Eclipse

Published on 6 Aug 2017

Total solar eclipse 2017: Everything to know about the upcoming celestial event
The countdown is on for Aug. 21, when a total solar eclipse will arc across the continental United States for the first time in decades.
Here’s everything you need to know about this rare and striking astronomical event that you won’t want to miss.
What is it?
A total solar eclipse is when the moon moves between the sun and Earth, lasting for up to about three hours from beginning to end, according to NASA. The lunar shadow will darken the sky, temperatures will drop and bright stars will appear at a time that is normally broad daylight.
Retired NASA astrophysicist and photographer Fred Espenak said the experience usually lasts for just a couple minutes, but it’s truly out of this world.

Source: The Cosmos News

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A Total Solar Eclipse Revealed Solar Storms 100 Years Before Satellites

Published on 17 Aug 2017

Eclipses set the stage for historic science. NASA is taking advantage of the Aug. 21, 2017 eclipse by funding 11 ground-based scientific studies. As our scientists prepare their experiments for next week, we’re looking back to an historic 1860 total solar eclipse, which many think gave humanity our first glimpse of solar storms — called coronal mass ejections — 100 years before scientists first understood what they were.
Scientists observed these eruptions in the 1970s during the beginning of the modern satellite era, when satellites in space were able to capture thousands of images of solar activity that had never been seen before. But in hindsight, scientists realized their satellite images might not be the first record of these solar storms. Hand-drawn records of an 1860 total solar eclipse bore surprising resemblance to these groundbreaking satellite images.
Eclipse archive imagery from:
http://mlso.hao.ucar.edu/hao-eclipse-…
Music credits: ‘Electricity Wave’ by Jean-Francois Berger [SACEM] and ‘Solar Winds’ by Ben Niblett [PRS], Jon Cotton [PRS]
This video is public domain and along with other supporting visualizations can be downloaded from the Scientific Visualization Studio at:
http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/12693
Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Joy Ng
If you liked this video, subscribe to the NASA Goddard YouTube channel:
http://www.youtube.com/NASAExplorer
Follow NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

Soure: NASA Goddard

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