The Safar-nama of Nasir Khusraw, Travels from 1046 to 1052 CE— Institute of Ismaili Studies| watch video with Dr. Alice Hunsberger and Prof.Eric Ormsby

An Introduction

Safar-nama of Nasir-i Khusraw

Safar-nama of Nasir-i Khusraw

The Safar-nama is record of an expansive journey undertaken by a Persian poet and philosopher, Nasir Khusraw, in the mid-11th CE century. He travelled from Central Asia to the Mediterranean Coast, Egypt, Arabia and back and appears to have compiled his Safar-nama in the latter half of the same century.

Nasir Khusraw is esteemed as one of the great Persian poets and philosophers. The delight in his works has led centuries of Persian-speaking people and others to admire him for his literary capabilities. Amongst the Shi’a Ismaili Muslims, he is also revered as a prominent da‘i of the Fatimid era (r. 10th-11th CE century). 

The Safar-nama, or literally “Travelogue,” is a simple and accessible text written in eloquent Persian. It seems to have been written to impress the reader with the sometimes strange and often wonderful things seen by Nasir during his travels rather than with the linguistic skills and capabilities of the author.

The rich tapestry of the Safar-nama, woven from the intellectual curiosity and unique world view of a master craftsman, is a rewarding and enlightening read. Nasir offers meticulous descriptions of the cities and towns he visits. Along the way, he shares with his readers amusing anecdotes and keen insights into not just culture, history, society, and geography but also into human nature, and the innate capacity of human beings to flourish in marvellous ways. These aspects of his narrative style afford the reader a rare glimpse into Nasir’s agile and curious mind.

Underpinning the captivating descriptions of the world, however, one finds the voice of an individual in relentless pursuit of truth; someone with a burning desire to seek answers to the questions of existence and purpose in the world, where bounties and perils exist side by side.

The Safar-nama has also been studied extensively, in the Persian-speaking world and beyond, for clues it might offer to the history of customs, society, religion, and archaeology. 

https://player.vimeo.com/video/85826715

https://player.vimeo.com/video/85826714

 

Source: http://nasirkhusraw.iis.ac.uk/journey

 

->>>>><<<<<-

Leave a comment

Filed under Travelogue in Persian.

Tourism Project Provides Hospitality and Tour Guide Training to Palestinians in West Bank

The Abraham Path. Section Hebron to Dura

Abraham Path, section Awarta to Duma

A homeowner in Aqraba welcomes guests. Homestays have popped up along the Abraham Path giving tourists an opportunity to experience Palestinian culture and homeowners the ability to make a living. 

API/Frits Meyst

WEST BANK, August 17, 2015—Spanning more than 300 kilometers in the West Bank, and continuing across Jordan, Israel and the Sinai Peninsula in Egypt, the Abraham trekking path is considered one of the world’s most attractive tourist destinations.

Along the path, which follows the footsteps of Abraham, a prominent historical figure in Judaism, Christianity and Islam, entrepreneurs have set up guide shops, guest houses, restaurants and much more. In the West Bank, the path provides thriving business opportunities for 53 communities along the path’s mostly rural corridor – some of them living below the poverty line.

“Opening our house to hikers is a great way to exchange culture with our guests,” said Mesadah Meaddi, host of a homestay in Kufur Malek, a village northeast of Ramallah. “It is an opportunity to share our opinions, and anyone who comes gains a new understanding of Palestinian women.”

According to Meaddi, the benefits of this are mutual: “We are supported financially, and they have a chance to experience our life, culture, and home-made food.”

In 2014, with support from the World Bank Group, the Abraham Path Initiative and Masar Ibrahim al-Khalil, a partnership between the Palestine Wildlife Society, the Rozana Association and the Siraj Center for Holy Land Studies, launched a pilot program aimed at creating jobs and providing more opportunities to generate income for local people along the Abraham Path.

The $2.3 million initiative, funded through the World Bank Group’s State and Peacebuilding Fund (SPF), focuses on improving the lives of women and youth in particular and will inform how development agencies and governments enhance tourism activities in other fragile and conflict affected countries. Specifically, the project provides local men and women with tour guide certifications, hospitality training, the creation of practical hiker resources such as maps, accommodation and transportation information, and the creation of promotional materials to educate travelers about the Path. The project has four key components: (1) Investment in People and Institutions; (2) Path Development and Marketing; (3) Business Development and Communication; and (4) Action Research.

“The project provides additional income to rural communities along the Path and supports female participation in the local economy,” says Ali H. Abukumail, the World Bank Group’s Task Team Leader for the project. “It is an innovative project that aims to diversify tourism services in Palestine, building on its cultural assets and social values.”

Since its launch last January, the “Masar Ibrahim/Abraham Path: Economic Development across Fragile Communities” project, as the initiative is known, has trained 25 wilderness tour guides and certified another 15. The project has created a partnership between local councils and associations, youth groups, women’s groups and NGOs – particularly important in conflict affected countries where the social fabric of communities is often torn. Altogether, just under 300 members of the community have been trained in different tourism activities and more than 800 local people are benefiting.

” They showed us how to find our way without the use of modern technology, which is not always available in the harsh conditions of the desert. ” Naser Kaabneh -Tour Guide

“The tutors gave us great navigation training,” said Naser Kaabneh, a tour guide from Al-Auja. “They showed us how to find our way without the use of modern technology, which is not always available in the harsh conditions of the desert.”

Despite significant security challenges, including the 2014 Gaza War, the Abraham Path project continues to improve the lives of people along its corridor. The Palestinian Authority, with support from development partners including the World Bank Group, expects to further scale up the project in the future. 

“In addition to the socio-economic focus of this project,” said Abukumail, “we are also aiming to develop and disseminate lessons and insights that could be applied within the West Bank, and other countries in the Middle East and North Africa.”

 

Source:World Bank org

 

->>>>><<<<<-

Leave a comment

Filed under Middle East, Tourism

Islamgelehrter über den Terror: „Der Koran ändert sich nicht“— Cicero de (In German language–interview with Grand Imam of al-Azhar on terrorism, sectarian conflict and roll of al- Azhar)

Ahmad Mohammad al Tayyeb gilt als höchste religiöse Instanz im sunnitischen Islam. Was denkt er über den „Islamischen Staat“, über die Reform seiner Religion und die Schiiten?

picture alliance

ahmad_al_tayyeb_frank-walter_steinmeier

Imam Ahmad Mohammad al Tayyeb und Außenminister Frank-Walter Steinmeier im Mai in Kairo

Herr Großimam, wie viel Autorität hat Ihre Al-Azhar-Universität noch?
Ahmad Mohammad al Tayyeb: Al Azhar ist die Referenz für alle Sunniten weltweit. Und diese machen 90 Prozent der Muslime aus. Daraus entsteht die Stärke der Al Azhar. Wir versuchen immer, Versöhnung zwischen den Religionen zu schaffen. Zwischen Christen, Sunniten und Schiiten. Das ist ein Glied für den sozialen Frieden auf regionaler Ebene. Wir versuchen auch, den sozialen Frieden in der Welt zu etablieren.

Der „Islamische Staat“ stellt eine Herausforderung für die muslimische Gemeinschaft dar, aber auch ideologisch für den Islam. Wie geht Al Azhar damit um?
Ich bevorzuge die Bezeichnung „Islamischer Staat im Irak und Syrien“ statt „Islamischer Staat“, weil es zurzeit keinen islamischen Staat in diesem Sinne gibt. Es gibt islamische Staaten, und Al Azhar erkennt die neue Teilung der Welt auf der Grundlage internationaler Konventionen an. Sie besteht aus vielen Staaten, und jeder Staat hat seine Grenzen. Der Isis hingegen behauptet, ein weltumfassendes islamisches Kalifat durch Krieg errichten zu wollen. Das ist falsch.

Lehren Sie das auch an Ihrer Universität?
Al Azhar als Institution lehrt seine Studenten, dass der Islam sich nicht mittels Waffen verbreiten kann. Sondern durch Argumente, Logik und Überzeugung. Und dass die Kriege, die in Zeiten des Propheten stattgefunden haben, allesamt Verteidigungskriege waren. Sie hatten auch nicht das Ziel, andere Länder zu erobern und Menschen den Islam aufzuzwingen, wie es jetzt der Isis und andere islamistische bewaffnete Bewegungen tun. Es gibt nur eine Ausnahme, wann Muslime Krieg führen müssen: wenn ein anderer Waffen gegen sie richtet.

(…)

Die Maßnahmen von Al Azhar sind lediglich Reaktionen. Hätten Sie nicht viel früher das Bild des Islam verändern müssen?
Es ist erforderlich, den Islam so zu präsentieren, wie er ist: dass er den anderen respektiert, an den anderen glaubt und ihm die Glaubensfreiheit gewährt. Erneuerung ist im Islam vorgeschrieben. Aber die heutige Situation ist neu für uns. Wir hatten diese Probleme vor 20 Jahren nicht. Im Gegenteil, wir waren überrascht von dieser satanischen Pflanze, die aus der Erde herausgekrochen ist.

Was tun Sie dagegen?
Wir haben angefangen, uns damit auseinanderzusetzen. Es funktioniert nicht so, wie manche es fordern: Ändert euer kulturelles Erbe, ändert den Koran. Nein, der Koran ändert sich nicht. So wie ihr nicht fordert, dass sich die Bibel ändern muss, fordert bitte auch nicht, dass sich der Koran ändern muss. Was wir jetzt brauchen, ist eine Rückbesinnung auf den Koran. Und nicht eine Fehlinterpretation oder seinen Missbrauch für große politische Vorhaben. Wir müssen zurück zum barmherzigen Islam. Und in diesem werden keine Christen enthauptet, nur weil sie Christen sind.

(…)

Sie sprechen die Enthauptungen an. Diese schrecklichen Bilder …


Der Islam verbietet so etwas absolut. Er erkennt diese Praktiken nicht an. Zeigen Sie mir einen einzigen Menschen, den der Prophet enthauptet haben soll.

Trotzdem beruht die ideologische Grundlage von Isis auf dem Islam. Außerdem führen die Isis-Anhänger an, sie seien in einem Verteidigungskrieg.
Das ist ein schwerwiegender Fehler. Das ist eine Verunstaltung der Philosophie des Islam in Bezug auf Krieg und Selbstverteidigung. Dschihad wird im Koran als Kampf zur Selbstverteidigung verstanden. Aber es gibt dort auch den Dschihad mit der Vernunft, dem besseren Argument, mit dem aufrichtigen Verhalten. Diese Gruppen interpretieren feste islamische Lehren falsch. Sie bezeichnen Muslime und deren Regierende als Ungläubige, um den eigenen Dschihad rechtfertigen zu können.

Hat Al Azhar dazu beigetragen?
Al Azhar und der Islam tragen keine Schuld an dieser Auffassung. Al Azhar erklärt keinen Moslem als ungläubig, und der Islam erkennt an, dass es Menschen gibt, die nicht an ihn glauben. Er zwingt niemanden, zum Islam überzutreten – mit Waffen schon mal gar nicht. Das ist unmöglich. Man kann ein bestimmtes Verhalten mit Waffen erzwingen, aber niemals den Glauben.

Dennoch schafft es der „Islamische Staat“, viele von der Idee zu begeistern, den Islam durch Waffengewalt zu verbreiten.


Der größte Beweis, dass sie lügen, ist, dass sie den Islam in islamischen Ländern verbreiten wollen. Wer kommt auf so einen Blödsinn? Diese Bewegungen sind Phänomene, die entstanden sind unter anderem aufgrund der vielen Rückschläge für die Jugendlichen. Aufgrund der wirtschaftlichen Rückständigkeit unserer Länder. Der hohen Arbeitslosigkeit. Aber auch wegen der Herrschaft Israels über die Palästinenser über sehr, sehr lange Zeit. Diese Gruppen gewinnen an Stärke, weil hinter ihnen, ob Isis oder andere, große internationale Mächte stehen, die den Nahen Osten destabilisieren wollen. Weil es gerade erwünscht ist, hier Chaos zu stiften, die Grenzen zu verschieben, das Gleichgewicht zu verändern. Da ist es am einfachsten, die Religion zu missbrauchen.

(…)

Es scheint, als sei der Krieg in Jemen ein Krieg zwischen Schiiten und Sunniten. Und Sie sagen, die arabische Welt habe sich geeinigt? Gegen die Schiiten, weil der Iran die Huthis, die Jemens Parlament mit Waffengewalt aufgelöst haben, unterstützt?


Nein, nein, nein. Diese Frage ist sehr gefährlich. Die Araber haben nie Waffen gegen Schiiten getragen. Das ist falsch. Sie richten Waffen gegen die Abtrünnigen, die sich mit Waffengewalt gegen die Legitimität des jemenitischen Staates stellen. Das sind an erster Stelle Araber, Jemeniten [und nicht Schiiten, Anmerkung der Redaktion]. Der Jemen hat die arabische Welt um Hilfe gebeten, und die arabische Welt ist Jemen zu Hilfe geeilt. Das ist die eine Sache. Dass nun gesagt wird, dass die Araber sich vereint haben, um Waffen gegen die Schiiten zu richten, ist etwas ganz anderes. Das ist definitiv nicht passiert.

 

  Lesen sie vollständig in Cicero de

 

->>>>><<<<<-

Leave a comment

Filed under Egypt, Islam, Uncategorized

Six Degrees of Suriname — Written and illustrated by Norman Macdonald on Saudi Aramco World| A diverse country with Christian, Muslim, Hindus and others live peacefully side by side

Suriname is a country the size of Florida with a half million souls living with Guyana to the west, French Guiana east and giant Brazil south. Paramaribo, its capital, gives the impression of a peaceful coastal town back in the 1950s—until new cars and pickups bring you back to the present. Road signs are in Dutch, but driving is on the left, just as it was in the Netherlands before Napoleon invaded and switched it, but his decree never reached this Dutch colony.

Six Degrees of Suriname

Paramaribo is six degrees above the Equator. Your shadow at noon is under your feet. The city is 23 kilometers from the mouth of the Suriname River and the Atlantic Ocean, and two-thirds of the country’s population live there in the city. The heart of this metropolis is commended on the un’s World Heritage List, as it “reflects the multicultural society of Suriname.”

I went out to stroll through the downtown, where men and women were, it seemed, from all over, the results of so many migrations. Asia, Africa, the Amazonian interior; Indonesian and Indian; foreign students on bicycles and Creole women in patterned dresses. The 2012 census showed just under half the country identified as Christian, 22 percent as Hindu, 14 percent as Muslim and two percent as Winti (an indigenous religion), with just 200 Jews. That means this country has the highest percentage of both Muslims and Hindus in the hemisphere, kind of a living diversity model. The wooden, colonial-fusion architecture may have caught the un’s gaze, but to me people were the best sight. The street language is called Sranantongo, from the time when slaves from different backgrounds had to find ways to talk with each other, so it uses words from African languages as well as English, Dutch and Portuguese. The official language, though, is Dutch.

Travel away from Paramaribo, and it becomes a quiet country lifestyle. People sitting on their porches wave as you pass. A hundred kilometers ahead, the road ends abruptly at a river bus stop. There is a petrol station, a convenience store and boats to take you farther upriver into the mystical jungle. Evening around the oil lanterns, and the conversation goes from the coming election to the corruption scandals to the dry season that “must end soon.”

As darkness falls, the conversation maneuvres to stories of snakes and insects as big as animals that creep around in the dark. “When I was up-river the last time,” one man says, “a local caught a huge snake in the dark with his bare hands. Don’t know how he did it.” Then the drums started. It was a funeral celebration in a nearby village, and it beat on until after dawn.

Spaniards came to what is now Guyana about 1500. Pizarro listened covetously as Indians—probably Arawaks and Caribs—told of a powerful Inca king who bathed in a holy golden lake and draped himself from head to foot with gold.

Sir Walter Raleigh published a book in 1596 with the long title, The Discoverie of the Large, Rich, and Bewtiful Empyre of Gviana, with a relation of the great and Golden Citie of Manoa (which the Spanyards call El Dorado). On a 17th-century map drawn by the mapmaker Willem Blaeu, Manoa appears somewhere between the Orinoco River to the north and the Amazon south. The gold rush was on, and it’s mined to this day.

 

Flag of Surinam

Travel away from Paramaribo, and it becomes a quiet country lifestyle. People sitting on their porches wave as you pass. A hundred kilometers ahead, the road ends abruptly at a river bus stop. There is a petrol station, a convenience store and boats to take you farther upriver into the mystical jungle. Evening around the oil lanterns, and the conversation goes from the coming election to the corruption scandals to the dry season that “must end soon.”

As darkness falls, the conversation maneuvres to stories of snakes and insects as big as animals that creep around in the dark. “When I was up-river the last time,” one man says, “a local caught a huge snake in the dark with his bare hands. Don’t know how he did it.” Then the drums started. It was a funeral celebration in a nearby village, and it beat on until after dawn.

Spaniards came to what is now Guyana about 1500. Pizarro listened covetously as Indians—probably Arawaks and Caribs—told of a powerful Inca king who bathed in a holy golden lake and draped himself from head to foot with gold.

Sir Walter Raleigh published a book in 1596 with the long title, The Discoverie of the Large, Rich, and Bewtiful Empyre of Gviana, with a relation of the great and Golden Citie of Manoa (which the Spanyards call El Dorado). On a 17th-century map drawn by the mapmaker Willem Blaeu, Manoa appears somewhere between the Orinoco River to the north and the Amazon south. The gold rush was on, and it’s mined to this day.

 

(…)

Robert Bipat

physiologist

 

Robert Bipat

In Paramaribo and surrounding suburbs, there are 17 mosques. In the whole country there is an estimated 800. The majority of people practicing Islam are from Indonesia. Some are facing west for prayer while others face east. The rule is you have to pray toward Makkah. The early contract workers from Java continued their practice of praying to the west. Indian Muslims came here before the Javanese and were already facing east. I think tradition was at work. My father and grandfather did it this way. Why change?

 

I was born in Paranam. My mother was a teacher and my father an agricultural engineer. They went to the Netherlands when I was born and left me here in Suriname with my grandparents, who were Muslim and lived in Paranam. When it was time to join my parents, I refused to go. I was three. So I stayed with my grandparents. My father’s parents were Hindu.

My father passed away when I was 14. I went to the mosque with my grandfather, grandmother, aunts and uncles. That’s when we moved to Paramaribo. My grandfather was a pharmacist at a hospital. He is why I studied medicine and then went to Belgium to study further. I wasn’t that keen to practice medicine and now teach physiology.

I’m married and have two children. My son is young, and my daughter is 18 and studies economics at the university. Every discipline at the school is full of women. In my physiology class when I started teaching, of the 60 students, 10 were women. Now of the 60 students, 55 are women.

I live in a neighborhood where none of my neighbors is Muslim. We live peacefully and celebrate Christmas, ‘Id al-Fitr, etc. It is now Diwali, and I helped with the family lights. My two sisters are Hindu and are married to Hindus. We celebrate each other’s holidays, and when food is prepared at a party, we are sure vegetarians can eat.

 

Food in Surinam

(…)

Read full and view all on:

https://www.saudiaramcoworld.com/issue/201504/six.degrees.of.suriname.htm

 

->>>>><<<<<-

Leave a comment

Filed under Harmony, Tolerance

Violence in Israel: Extremism is spreading — An essay by the Israeli writer David Grossman on Qantara de

Blind, archaic hatred has driven a number of Israelis to commit murder in recent weeks. Today, it is evidently enough just to be a Palestinian or gay to be the target of attacks in Israel. An essay by the Israeli writer David Grossman

David Grossman

The murdered infant Ali Dawabshe gives me no peace. The thought that a man could tear open a window in the middle of the night and throw a Molotov cocktail into a room where parents and their children are sleeping haunts me. These thoughts and images are enough to break your heart. Who is the man, who are the men who could do such a thing? They and their associates walk among us this morning. Are their deeds written on their faces for all to see? What did they first have to kill inside themselves in order to be able to kill a family?

Benjamin Netanyahu and a few right-wing ministers immediately and vehemently condemned the murder. Netanyahu paid his condolences at the hospital, expressing his shock. His visit there was humane, authentic, correct and necessary. But one has to wonder how the prime minister and his fellow ministers manage to persist in utterly ignoring the link between the flames of the fire they have been fanning for the last 20 years and the flames of this recent arson attack.

How can they fail to see the connection between the occupation that has been going on now for 48 years and the sinister, fanatical reality in the border regions of the Israeli consciousness, a reality that is gaining ground every day? This reality is now putting out feelers towards the political centre ground and is gaining legitimacy and acceptance in the Israeli population, the Knesset and the cabinet.

In their staunch denial of this reality, the prime minister and his supporters are turning a blind eye to the misguided sentiment that has inexorably insinuated its way into the consciousness of the settlers over the course of nearly 50 years, namely that there are two kinds of people. One kind is subject to the other and thus seems by nature to be less worthy. The subjugated one is – how shall I put it? – a lesser person than the occupier. This attitude apparently enables people with a certain mental make-up to take another person’s life with frightening ease, even if that other person is only one and a half years old.

People rush to the aid of the victim of a knife attack on the Gay Pride Parade in Jerusalem, 30 July 2015 (photo: Getty Images/L. Mizrahi)

Deep-seated hatred: on 30 July 2015, an ultra-Orthodox Jew stabbed six people attending the Jerusalem “Gay Pride Parade” with a knife. A 16-year-old girl died as a result of the injuries she sustained in the attack

Exterminating those they hate

In this way, the two acts of violence that were committed at the end of July – the stabbing at the Jerusalem Gay Pride Parade and the arson attack on a baby – are connected, because they spring from a similar attitude. In both cases, blind, archaic hatred drove people to murder in an attempt to eradicate a hated people.

The man who set the Dawabshe family’s house on fire knew nothing about its inhabitants, about their hopes and dreams. He knew only that they were Palestinians, and that was enough for him and his commanders. In other words, their mere existence was reason enough to want to wipe them off the face of the earth.

For more than a hundred years now, Palestinians and Israelis have been caught up in a vicious circle of murder and revenge. In their battle against us, the Palestinians have murdered hundreds of Israeli children, killed entire families and committed crimes against humanity.

With the help of aircraft, tanks and snipers, the State of Israel has done similar deeds in its fight against the Palestinians. What happened a year ago in the Gaza Strip during the military operation “Zuk Eitan” (“Protective Edge”) is still fresh in our minds. But the entire process taking place within the State of Israel, with all its vicious excesses and ramifications, is destructive in another deceptive way.

The Israeli leadership still doesn’t seem to understand – or perhaps it doesn’t want to admit what for it is an unbearable fact – that the Jewish terrorism it is harbouring within has now declared war on the state. And now the state is either unable or too afraid or too ambivalent to face up to this challenge and call it by its name.

Day-in day-out, sinister and fanatical elements among us, hermetic in their extremism, are kindling their own religious nationalist fire and ignoring the boundaries normally set on behaviour by reality, morality and common sense. As if intoxicated, they become entangled in the most ludicrous delusions of which the human soul is capable. The more insecure the economic situation, the more they thrive. A compromise with these forces is not possible.

Benjamin Netanyahu (photo: Reuters/D. Balilty)

“Does Netanyahu see in all clarity that during all those years when he was devoting his undivided attention to torpedoing the Iran nuclear agreement, a highly volatile situation has arisen in this country – a situation that is no less dangerous than the threat posed by Iran, and that he appears helpless to do anything about it?” asks David Grossman

Rigorous action against terror is needed

The Israeli government must proceed against them just as rigorously as it does against Palestinian terrorism, because they are no less dangerous and no less determined. These are totalitarian extremists, who, as we know, are capable of extremely misguided actions, as for example an assault on the Al-Aqsa Mosque would be, an assault that would in all likelihood spell doom for Israel and the entire Middle East.

Will an atrocity like the burning of a baby bring Israel’s right wing to its senses? Will these people finally comprehend what reality has been screaming in their faces all these years, namely that persisting with the occupation and refusing to engage in a dialogue with the other side could spell the end of Israel as the state of the Jewish people and as a democracy? As a place with which young people identify, where they would like to live and raise their children?

Does Netanyahu see in all clarity that during all those years when he was devoting his undivided attention to torpedoing the Iran nuclear agreement, a highly volatile situation has arisen in this country – a situation that is no less dangerous than the threat posed by Iran, and that he appears helpless to do anything about it?

It is hard to say how we can extricate ourselves from this calamity and return to normalcy. By yielding to the settlers’ activism and through their tacit agreement with them, Netanyahu and his friends (along with most of his predecessors) have encouraged these developments. Now, reality has caught up with them and they are left to look on, horrified and paralysed.

For dozens of years now, the State of Israel has being showing the Palestinians its dark side, and this darkness has long been seeping into its own deepest reaches. The process has accelerated since Netanyahu’s recent election victory, because since then, no one has been willing to confront the predatory ruthlessness of the right wing. Atrocities such as the burning of a baby are symptoms of a deeply rooted social ailment and relentlessly confront us Israelis with this diagnosis. They proclaim in fiery letters that the door to a better future is gradually closing.

David Grossman

 

Translated from the German by Jennifer Taylor

More on this topic

 

Source: Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung/Qantara.de 2015

->>>>><<<<<-

Leave a comment

Filed under Israel, Jewish terrorist, Occupation of palestine

Germany’s energy transition is not an island of its own — by Ralf Fücks on Heinrich Boell Foundation de|Germany has the chance to become a pioneer in a green industrial revolution

The energy transition could become the driver for an industrial renaissance of Europe.

The energy transition could become the driver for an industrial renaissance of Europe.. Photo: Jenud. Creative Commons LizenzvertragThis image is licensed under Creative Commons License.

The restructuring of the energy system in one of the world’s leading industrialized nations is undoubtedly a highly ambitious undertaking. There is no blueprint for this energy transition that would offer a simple step-by-step procedure to follow. In that sense, the Energiewende is an open learning process and pilot project at the same time, one that is being observed internationally with a mixture of hope and skepticism. However, there is one thing that the German energy transition is certainly not: an island of its own that isolates Germany’s energy economy. On the contrary, a quick overview of the world’s state of affairs with regard to energy shows that the global energy transition is now picking up speed, as Ralf Fücks points out.

(…)

 

Photo-German Energy Transition. Creative Commons LizenzvertragThis image is licensed under Creative Commons License.

(…)

2get_6a9_price_of_new_nuclear_higher_than_wind_solar_l

(…)

3get_en_1a7_more_renewables_strengthen_germanys_energy_security1

(…)

4get_1a4_renewables_create_more_jobs_l

Photos: German Energy Transition. Creative Commons LizenzvertragThis image is licensed under Creative Commons License.

Thus, instead of stepping back and putting the energy transition on hold, Germany has the chance to become a pioneer in a green industrial revolution that will serve as a global model for sustainable growth. The more we are able to drive the energy transition at the European scale, the more successful we will be with this project. The triumph of renewable energies will promote local self-reliance and regional energy cycles. However, here we must strive for the optimal use of synergy effects of renewables at the pan-European scale, while avoiding a re-nationalization of European energy policy. A Europe-wide network with wind power from the coastal regions, hydropower from Scandinavia and the Alps, solar energy from the sun belt around the Mediterranean, and biomass power plants in the vast agricultural areas of Central and Eastern Europe will guarantee energy security and reduce the need for expensive electricity storage facilities. Such a vast, cross-regional network does not run counter to decentralized structures but improves the stability and economic efficiency of the overall system.

(…)

Read full and view graphics on Heinrich Boell Foundation de

 

->>>>><<<<<-

Leave a comment

Filed under Germany, Renewable energy

Video: Begum Umm-e Habiba Aga Khan-In Loving Memory

Noorun Mubeen

Noorun Mubeen

Published on 11.08.2015

 

->>>>><<<<<-

Leave a comment

Filed under Umm-e Habiba Aga Khan